IMPACT OF DIET ON BRAIN FUNCTIONING
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Our brain is always “on.” It takes care of your thoughts and movements, your breathing and heartbeat, your senses — it works hard 24/7, even while you’re asleep. This means your brain requires a constant supply of fuel. That “fuel” comes from the foods you eat — and what’s in that fuel makes all the difference. Put simply, what you eat directly affects the structure and function of your brain and, ultimately, your mood.The bad impact of diet on brain functioning issues like diabetes , obesity etc.

You may have witnessed the short-term effects of food on your brain: a sugar rush after too much candy or a mental fog from hunger. But what we eat also affects us in the long term. Starting in the womb and continuing into old age, our diets don’t just shape our bodies, but our brains as well.

Poor diets lead to a host of medical issues: obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. But diet also influences the brain and can increase the risk for mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Researchers are uncovering the details of how the foods we consume affect our cravings, our moods, and even our memories.

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Impact of food eat by mothers on child

Food preference first develops in the womb. Studies show that if moms drink carrot juice during pregnancy, infants are more likely to prefer the flavor of carrots. 

Extra sugar rich food

the impact of diet on brain functioning includes consume more sugary drinks (sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and the like) than people in other age groups. Sugar — especially in the form of high fructose corn syrup, which is now ubiquitous in everything from soda and salad dressing to yogurt and bread — can increase levels of stress hormones in the brain. As adolescence is a crucial time for brain development, high sugar consumption and the subsequent increase in stress hormones during this time may trigger mental health problems, like anxiety and depression.

Obesity and memory

some studies have found a link between body weight and the size of the hippocampus, an area of the brain important for learning and memory. Researchers in Australia investigated this link in adults by measuring the size of the hippocampus and comparing it to the person’s body mass index (BMI), a ratio of weight to height that is used to determine if someone is overweight.

Our brains are sculpted by what we eat. If it’s too much fat, too much sugar, or just too much, there may be permanent consequences for our brain function. Keeping our brains in shape is one more reason to clean up our diets.

Anjali

Studying bachelor of elementary education from lady shri ram college , part of NCC-LSR , Hard working and punctual.

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