New Education Policy 2019
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The last national policy on Education (NPE) was released in 1986 and modified in 1992. Since there are major changes happen from 1986 to till now in worldwide and within the country. Therefore education policy need to be modified as per the current scenario.
A new committee was set up in June 2017, under the chairmanship of Dr. Krishnaswamy kasturirangan. This committee handed over the draft to it’s New Education policy 2019 to the central government.

Some important features from the draft of NPE-2019 are:-

⦁ The draft built on the fundamental pillars of equity, quality , affordability and accountability.

⦁ the policy emphasised critically of the early years and aims to ensure quality early childhood care and education.

⦁ There will be special attention paid to early language and mathematics in primary classes.

⦁ Free and compulsory education from preschool to 12th class

⦁ There will be extra-curricular activities such as arts , music , crafts, sports , yoga , community service etc.

⦁ The 4 year integrated stage b.ed programme will be the minimum degree qualification for teacher.

New Education Policy 2019Important Points

⦁ The Committee noted that the current board examinations: (i) force students to concentrate only on a few subjects, (ii) do not test learning in a formative manner, and (iii) cause stress among students. To track students’ progress throughout their school experience, the draft Policy proposes State Census Examinations in classes three, five and eight. Further, it recommends restructuring the board examinations to test only core concepts, skills and higher order capacities.

⦁ The Committee noted that establishing primary schools in every habitation across the country has helped increase access to education. However, it has led to the development of very small schools (having low number of students). The small size of schools makes it operationally complex to deploy teachers and critical physical resources. Therefore, the draft Policy recommends that multiple public schools should be brought together to form a school complex.

⦁ Currently, higher educational institutions can only be set up by Parliament or state legislatures. The draft Policy proposes that these institutions could be allowed to be set up through a Higher Education Institution Charter from NHERA. This Charter will be awarded on the basis of transparent assessment of certain specified criteria. All such newly constituted higher educational institutions must receive accreditation as mandated by NHERA within five years of being established.

⦁ The Committee observed that poor service conditions and heavy teaching loads at higher education institutions have resulted in low faculty motivation. Further, lack of autonomy and no clear career progression system are also major impediments to faculty motivation. The draft Policy recommends development of a Continuous Professional Development programme and the introduction of a permanent employment (tenure) track system for faculty in all higher education institutions by 2030. Further, a desirable student-teacher ratio of not more than 30:1 must be ensured.

The Government of India will bring out the above draft on National Education Policy to meet the changing dynamics of the population’s requirements with regards to quality education, innovation and research, aiming to make India a knowledge superpower by equipping its students with the necessary skills and knowledge and to eliminate the shortage of manpower in science, technology, academics and industry.

Also read: Education system in india, Caste system in india

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Anjali

Studying bachelor of elementary education from lady shri ram college , part of NCC-LSR , Hard working and punctual.

This Post Has One Comment

  1. Yea right thanks 😊

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